How to Clean Drywall Dust off Wood Floors (7 Easy Steps)

How to Clean Drywall Mud off Wood Floors

The renovation work is complete! Your house looks beautiful except for the drywall dust that is littered all over your wood floors.

At this point, you know you have some work cut out for you; now, the cleanup begins.

Vacuuming at this point looks like an invalid effort since the dust ends up spreading into cracks and gaps in the flooring.

If such a scenario painted above is relatable, then you ought to learn how to clean drywall dust off wood floors, which is what this article is all about.

Vacuuming alone cannot get rid of drywall dust; you have to repeatedly mop the area with a vinegar and water solution.

Now, read on as we run you through the steps and procedures required to clean drywall dust off wood floors.

How to Clean Drywall Dust off Wood Floors

How to Clean Drywall Dust off Wood Floors

You are about to embark on your wall renovation project, right? You should cover up your wood floor before texturing the walls or ceiling.

Now, in a case where you failed to do that, you will have to deal with the aftermath.

Follow these steps to clean drywall dust off your beautiful wood floors.

Read Also: How To Get Rid Of Ants On Kitchen Floor

Step 1: Safety First

Safety first, before you start cleaning. Whether or not you’ve got respiratory problems, please wear a dust mask or a respirator.

You don’t want to inhale the harmful drywall dust that might get kicked up in the air during the cleaning process.

Step 2: Open the Windows and Doors in Your House

Do you know that drywall dust can trigger an attack on asthmatic persons? Even if you’re not asthmatic, it can clog your nostrils, and you might find it difficult to breathe!

So, do you see the need to increase ventilation in your house?

You can do this by opening up all the windows and switching off all the vents, heating, and air conditioning systems in the house.

This will ensure that the least amount of drywall dust is circulating in the house while you clean it up.

Step 3: Place a Fan at The Window Facing Outside

You want to increase the ventilation in the house, and that entails placing a fan at the window facing outside.

This way, most of the drywall dust will be directed outside. (An excellent portable fan such as the Lasko 20″ High-Velocity Quick Mount Fan will do a great job)

If possible, place at least two fans facing outside on two windows for more effectiveness.

Step 4: Sweep

Most persons make the mistake of vacuuming drywall dust without sweeping; you shouldn’t do that.

You want to get out as much dust as you can first before using a vacuum cleaner.

Use a broom to collect the dust and dump it in dust bags using a dustpan.

If the dust is too much, spray a water mist first before sweeping. Give the dust about 15 minutes to settle before proceeding to the next step.

Step 5: Vacuum

Now, you get to vacuum! You should use a vacuum cleaner meant for dust with a brush attachment.

The Dustless D1603 shop vac is a great option; it has powerful suction, a fine 3-stage dust filter, and excellent airflow.

Vacuum from top to bottom left to right, and move gently because drywall dust usually clings to walls.

Step 6: Mop the Room with a Vinegar Solution

Since drywall dust can be clingy, sometimes cleaning it with most commercial floor cleaners might not yield good results.

A vinegar, water, and soap dishwater solution might yield a better result.

To make this solution, pour two cups of white vinegar in a gallon of warm water; alternatively, you can add a little drop of dishwasher soap.

Easy, right?

For wood floors, a microfiber cloth or mop is recommended. Dip the cloth or mop into the solution and mop in small areas. Once you’re done mopping, dry the area thoroughly with a towel.

Read Also: Easiest Way To Clean Grout Without Scrubbing

Step 7: Ventilate the Room

Before you start using the room, you need to make sure the room is adequately ventilated.

Also, check to make sure no new dust particles have settled onto other surfaces in the house before using it.

How to Clean Drywall Mud off Wood Floors

Drywall mud is also called drywall compound, and they surface when you’re installing drywall in any room or home.

A splatter of drywall compound or drywall mud can get on your wood floors during the installation process.

This mud can be challenging to remove once it is dried, but you should be able to remove them with the right technique.

Follow these steps below:

Step 1: Get the Needed Materials

First things first; get clean rags, adhesive remover, painter’s tape, and putty knife.

Most of these supplies can be gotten from most hardware stores around you.

Step 2: Wipe Off the Drywall Mud with a Wipe Cloth

You should want to deal with the drywall mud spill immediately.

The sooner that you clean up the compound, the easier it will be to remove it.

Dip a cloth in warm water and gently use it to wipe up the compound. Wipe it carefully to avoid spreading it around the floor.

Rinse the floor and repeat the process all over again.

Step 3: Use the Adhesive Remover

First, use painter’s tape to isolate the part of the floor where the compound has dried.

Then pour the adhesive remover onto the affected area where the spill occurred if the compound has dried. The painter’s tape is to prevent the adhesive remover from getting to other parts of the floor.

Step 4: Give the Adhesive Remover Minutes to Dry and Scrape Off

This is to loosen the mud, then use the putty knife to scrape off the mud.

Please make sure you don’t use a metal knife, as the sharp edge could create a scratch or divot on your floor; after this, clean with a dry rag.

How To Clean Drywall Dust on Concrete Floor

The best way to clean up drywall dust from concrete is to scrape up the compound with a trowel, then scrub it with a damp sponge, repeating the process until the floor is clean.

Conclusion

I hope this post on how to clean drywall dust off wood floors has provided all the information you need to make your work easier.

Good luck with your cleaning!

Read Also: How To Get Rid Of Grease On Kitchen Floor

Scroll to Top